6 Must-Read Hollywood Bios to Take on Vacation

books
books

Whether you’re relaxing in a hammock, sunbathing on a beach, or curled up on your couch, the right book can improve any vacation. And since truth is more entertaining than fiction, it’s impossible to go wrong with a great biography. To help you select the perfect read, here are six new Hollywood bios you won’t want to miss!

“Born With Teeth” by Kate Mulgrew

Audiences first met Kate Mulgrew on the soap opera “Ryan’s Hope,” but it was her role as the intrepid Captain Janeway on “Star Trek: Voyager” that launched her career. Today, Netflix viewers know her as the no-nonsense prisoner Red on “Orange is the New Black.” This moving autobiography begins with her unorthodox Irish Catholic upbringing in Iowa and follows her all the way to New York City where she studied acting with the legendary Stella Adler. Mulgrew’s stories about her various film and TV roles are delightful, but it’s her tale about giving a daughter up for adoption, and then reuniting years later, that will move you to tears.

“De Niro: A Life” by Shawn Levy

A fascinating portrait of perhaps the most gifted, and intensely private, actor in the history of American cinema. This highly-readable biography of Robert De Niro belongs on the shelf of everyone who loves “Taxi Driver,” “Raging Bull” and “Goodfellas.” Exhaustively researched and engagingly written, “De Niro: A Life” by film critic Shawn Levy chronicles the Oscar-winning star from his childhood in 1940s Greenwich Village to his work on masterpieces such as “The Godfather Part II” and “The Deer Hunter.” Through interviews and analysis Levy pulls back the curtain, revealing De Niro as we’ve never seen him before.

“I Don’t Know What You Know Me From” by Judy Greer

Whether she’s stealing scenes on hit TV shows like “Two and a Half Men” and “Arrested Development,” or elevating blockbusters like “Jurassic World” and “Ant-Man” with her unique personality, Judy Greer is one of Hollywood’s best-kept secrets. A consummate comedienne with dramatic skills to match, her new memoir is a hilariously self-deprecating look at the life of a professional actress. Loaded with juicy stories from the sets of some of your favorite movies, “I Don’t Know What You Know Me From” proves that Greer is more than just a charming second banana, she’s an expert storyteller. For even more fun, try the audiobook, narrated by the author herself!

“Becoming Richard Pryor” by Scott Saul

Raised in his grandmother’s brothel and educated on the streets, Richard Pryor’s blazing intellect and exhilarating stage presence catapulted him to stardom in the turbulent 1970s. Historian and critic Scott Saul’s remarkable biography brings the groundbreaking comic to life through in-depth interviews, court transcripts and personal journals. Much more than just another rags-to-riches story, Saul paints Pryor as a cultural trailblazer whose genius for laughter masked a deeply wounded soul. Insightful and provocative, “Becoming Richard Pryor” is the definitive portrait of a brilliant performer.

“Shirley, I Jest!” by Cindy Williams

A witty autobiography from TV’s quintessential best friend, this is the perfect book for anyone who misses the happy days of “Laverne and Shirley.” From her working-class childhood in Van Nuys, California, to her embarrassing auditions for roles on shows such as “Room 222” and “Love American Style,” the woman we meet in these pages is every bit as spunky and lovable as her famous alter ego. Along the way, Williams spins one memorable anecdote after another, including the time rocker Jim Morrison caused her to break down in tears when a practical joke at the Whisky-A-Go-Go got a bit out of hand. A nostalgic treat for vintage TV fans!

“One Lucky Bastard” by Roger Moore

Since the latest 007 film “Spectre” premieres in November, now is the perfect time to read this breezily enjoyable memoir from an actor whose debonair style and sophisticated humor redefined James Bond in the ‘70s and ‘80s. Known in Hollywood as a playful prankster whose self-effacing charm is exceeded only by his humanitarianism, Sir Roger Moore’s latest book is a collection of on-set stories involving everyone from Sean Connery and Michael Caine, to Frank Sinatra and Audrey Hepburn. Moore’s tales from Tinseltown will leave you shaken, stirred and begging for more.